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Tag Archives: Izzy Hudgins

‘Tis the season for luxurious gowns and cozy knits—loveliest when layered up for a look that’s as easy as it is enchanting.

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An unexpected botanical discovery on Ossabaw Island reveals a direct connection to Georgia’s colonial past. Allison Hersh explores the indelible appeal of indigo.

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  From the (figurative) ashes of Hang Fire Bar, mix-master Wes Daniel is raising some sophisticated Cain.

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Savannah might be home to the next big skincare sensation—and we have two local ladies to thank for it.

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SavMagThanksgiving15-7Photography by Izzy Hudgins

 
“I like to create looks that are timeless and practical,” says designer Jessica Pata, “So I drew my inspiration from the very thing that brings people together on Thanksgiving: food.”
  [caption id="attachment_15801" align="aligncenter" width="384"]The wishbones go back to a family tradition.  My mother would keep the wishbone from the turkey for my brother and me to wish on.” "The wishbones go back to a family tradition.  My mother would keep the wishbone from the turkey for my brother and me to wish on.”[/caption] [caption id="attachment_15802" align="aligncenter" width="384"]Savannah Candy Kitchen was the place for epic pralines and pecan caramel apples— a creative, local Thanksgiving dessert. Savannah Candy Kitchen was the place for epic
pralines and pecan caramel apples—
a creative, local Thanksgiving dessert.[/caption]
SavMagThanksgiving15-23
Thankful Sweet Potato Puree
Try caterer Josh Thomas’ lightly sweetened, airy alternative to candied yams. Serves 10 5 whole sweet potatoes, peeled 8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter 1 cup heavy cream ¼ cup tightly packed light brown sugar 2 tablespoons orange blossom honey Salt and white pepper to taste In a large stockpot over high heat, boil sweet potatoes whole until they are fork tender, approximately 15 to 20 minutes.  While the potatoes cook, melt the butter into the heavy cream on low heat, careful not to boil. When the potatoes are done, strain off the boiling liquid and place the whole potatoes in the carafe of a blender.  Add the warmed cream, brown sugar and honey then blend until smooth.  Taste and add salt and pepper to balance the flavors.  Strain the mixture through a fine mesh sieve into a medium saucepan, keeping the puree warm until ready to serve.  
SavMagThanksgiving15-28Sparkling Caramel Apple Sangria
Freshen up your feast with a pitcher of Jessica Pata’s swanky, seasonal sipper. Serves 6 2 apples, peeled, cored and chopped 1 (750ml) bottle of semi-sweet white wine ¾ cup caramel vodka 2 cups apple cider 1 cup club soda Caramel sauce to rim the glass (optional) Add chopped apples to a large pitcher.  Stir in wine, caramel vodka and apple cider.  Chill in refrigerator for 2 hours.  Stir in club soda right before serving. [gallery ids="15819,15818,15817,15816,15815,15814,15813,15805,15806,15807,15812,15811,15810,15809,15808"]
SPECIAL THANKS TO
Event design: Jessica Pata, House of Pata Venue: The Creative Coast’s event space, The Creators’ Foundry Floral design: Kim Cheney, August Floral and Event Design Caterer: Josh Thomas, J Thomas Catering and Events Desserts: Savannah Candy Kitchen pecan caramel apples and original pralines Rentals: Savannah Special Events by Ranco beaded glass chargers, channel-back chairs, white linens and white napkins Tablecloth and runner: Nuage Designs in bone and silver metallic stripe pattern Accessories: World Market glass candle holders, silverware and glasses; Homegoods silver-rimmed dinner and salad plates; Lucky Break wishbone Guests: Raymond Anaya, Katie Clark, Steve Schulte and Christi Reiterman  

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Cashing in on her editorial privilege, Annabelle Carr takes the turn-key approach to life on the water.

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[caption id="attachment_15146" align="aligncenter" width="576"]ExoticFoods_24 Saucey shelves at the Chinatown Market. Photo by Izzy Hudgins.[/caption] For our May/June feature on Feasts of the Southern Wild, in which we explore our seaport's most exotic flavors, we asked three local tastemakers for some inspiration.  Here are their recipes » 
Farmer's Market Kimchi
Most people picture napa cabbage when they think of Kimchi, but the last time Josh Yates of Green Truck Pub made Kimchi, he used bok choi from Statesboro's Honeydew Farm, available at the Forsyth Farmer's Market in the late fall/winter months.  He's also had success using baby collards that Relinda Walker famously grows.   3 pounds bok choi, tatsoi or baby collards, washed 1/3 cup kosher salt 2 tablespoons soy sauce 1/4 cup fish sauce (available at the area's Asian markets. Josh recommends 3 Crabs brand.) 1 1/2 cups Korean chili powder (Josh's note: Best to just ask the nice lady behind the counter at Han Me.) 2 bunches scallions or spring onion tops, chopped. Cloves of 1 whole head garlic, peeled 3 to 4 inches fresh ginger, peeled 1/2 to 1 pound daikon radish, or other radish or carrots depending on seasonal/local availability, coarsely shredded on box grater Rough chop your greens and toss with the salt in your largest mixing bowl, trying to distribute the salt evenly.  Cover with cold water (you may need to put a plate on top to keep the greens from floating.)  Let greens soak at least 8 hours or overnight.  Remove to a colander, reserving the brine. In your food processor, puree garlic, ginger, chili powder, soy and fish sauces to a fine paste.  Toss well with greens, scallions and radish/carrots and pack in to large sterilized mason jars.  Pour a little of the brine in to just cover most of the kimchi.  Loosely screw on lids and "burp" the lid every day to release any gas that might build up.  You can leave this out in a dark corner at room temperature for as little as 1 to 2 days or as much as a week, depending on how funky you like it.  Feel free to taste daily, and careful in the summer months as it goes much faster! [caption id="attachment_15147" align="aligncenter" width="384"]ExoticFoods_15 Photo by Izzy Hudgins[/caption]  
Octopus Salad
Joe Monti, Jerry Gault's brother in law, forwarded his family recipe for octopus salad.  "Now, by no means am I a chef.  I have no formal culinary training, however this recipe was taught to me by my father, who was born in Italy on an island off the coast of Naples called Ischia, next to the Isle of Capri.  Whenever I asked my father for measurements, it was always in Italian and made no sense, so my cooking has been mostly by trial and error and I find myself guilty of inheriting my father's inability to measure, and more to rely on my senses." 2 medium-sized octopuses, roughly 2 to 3 pounds each, cleaned 4 or 5 celery stalks and leaves, coarsely chopped 3 or 4 garlic cloves, minced A good drizzle of olive oil, roughly two tablespoonsOlive Oil a good drizzle Juice of one lemon, freshly squeezed Kalamata olives, as many as you like, cut in half 1/2 medium red onion, chopped Fresh parsley, coarsely chopped Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste Place the octopuses in boiling water for an hour, or until tender.  Warning, do this outside, because octopus has a tendency to be malodorous.  Once boiling is complete, brush the octopus with olive oil, salt and pepper, and place the octopuses on a hot grill to get a quick char on all side.  Once the octopus is done, cut them into bite size pieces and mix in a large bowl with the remaining ingredients. Note from Joe: I believe this is the basic recipe for your classic Mediterranean octopus salad. My father also called it a seafood salad and would add cooked scungilli, or as we like to call it down south, conch.  Cook the same as octopus-minus the grilling.  He would also add cooked squid (blanched in boiling water for a few minutes) cut into rings. Thanks to Jerry I'm able to enjoy a taste of my heritage and remember some of the fonder memories of my father and times with my family as a child.  
Turbo G & T with Safi Preserved Limes
Courtesy of Margaret Coughlin at B. Matthews Eatery 1 1/2 ounces Tuthilltown Half Moon Orchard Gin 1 ounce Jack Rudy Small Batch Tonic Preserved limes (recipe below) Shake gin and tonic with ice, strain over ice into glass. Garnish with two preserved limes.
Preserved Limes
5 limes 1/4 to 1/2 cup kosher salt 2 cinnamon sticks 3 to 5 whole cloves Small handful coriander seeds 4 to 5 black peppercorns 1 to 2 bay leaf Freshly squeezed lime juice Quarter the limes from the top to within 1/2 inch of the bottom, sprinkle salt on the exposed flesh, then reshape the fruit. Place a tablespoon or two of salt on the bottom of the sterilized mason jar. Pack in the limes and push them down, adding more salt, and the spices between layers. Press the limes down to release their juices and to make room for the remaining limes. Add enough freshly squeezed lime juice to cover the fruit. Leave some air space before sealing the jar. Let the limes ripen in a warm place, shaking the jar each day to distribute the salt and juice. Let ripen for 30 days. To use, rinse the limes, removing and discarding the pulp, if desired—and there is no need to refrigerate after opening. Preserved limes will keep up to a year, and the pickling juice can be used two or three times over the course of a year.    

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For many brides-to-be, their dream wedding started March 2 at Savannah's signature boutique bridal event, Behind the Veil.

Savannah Weddings magazine, title sponsor Telfair Museums and Visit Savannah presented the 5th annual Behind the Veil with a select group of top wedding professionals on hand to help brides and their wedding parties plan for the perfect day.  The afternoon features tastings, consultations, luxe giveaways and a top-label gown show, presented by BleuBelle Bridal Boutique, Simon's Formal Wear, B Street Salon, Savannah Makeup and Skincare Professionals, Urban Poppy, and Jeremy Davis & The Equinox Jazz Quintet. We wanted to share the celebration with you.  These images from photographer Izzy Hudgins are your ticket to inspiration »

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Against the classic backdrop of a historic mansion, a member of the local “glitterati” designs a porch party rife with personalized touches and sparkling signature details. ¦ Photography by Izzy Hudgins

“I  love sparkle,” Andrea Gray Harper says, explaining why she chose New Year’s Eve for her creative inspiration.  “And right now I’m obsessed with gold.” To take an evening of carousing to a new level of easy elegance, Andrea brought her sequins and swank to Brockington Hall, an Italianate villa-style venue in the heart of the Historic District. “It’s a glamorous old building with a wide porch—because Savannahians love to party outside,” she explains, praising the “unusual, graphic ironwork” that provided a perfect backdrop to her effervescent dinner party on the veranda. To achieve her shimmering vision, Andrea called in reinforcements: Wendy Patrick of Thrive Café and Catering to pack the menu with local flavors, bartender Jacob Sanford to concoct a signature cocktail, and graphic designer Samantha Sanford of Lavender and Honey designs to create “graphic and glittery” stationery, including personalized Champagne labels. “Look at the people around you and see who can help you,” she urges.  “There are a lot of really creative people in Savannah.” A brilliant setting:  Andrea made a tablecloth out of black sequined fabric and designed a sparkly gold table runner.  She hung a gold piñata to represent the midnight “ball drop,” then brought out her family’s vintage china, cutting circular menu cards that fit in the base of each plate. It’s a wrap:  “Something as simple as paper can make an ordinary object extraordinary,” advises Andrea, who used striped paper to turn ordinary cylindrical vases into a bold centerpiece filled with roses, scabiosa pods, gilded magnolias and fluffy, white peacock feathers. Culinary accents:  Savannahians eat the peas-and-rice dish Hoppin’ John for good luck at the New Year, so Wendy’s menu boasted a locally sourced version.  And, instead of coating the traditional blini with caviar, Wendy served the New Year’s delicacy on local grit cakes. Sip ’n’ see:  “I always stop by Party City to pick up ‘to-go’ cups that match the palette of each event,” says Andrea, who found gold cups for this event.  “‘Travelers’ are a beloved Savannah tradition, and I just like when an event makes sense from start to finish.” Festive, not fussy:  To help her female guests shine for the occasion, Andrea invited Jules DeJesus Fritz and Emily Warren of Dollface by Jules to host a pre-party beauty bash, freshening faces with red lips and metallic accents.  
Jacob’s Seelbach Champagne Cocktail
1 oz. bourbon 1/2 oz. Cointreau triple sec 7 dashes Angostura bitters 7 dashes Peychaud’s bitters Champagne Ice cubes Lemon twists for garnish With a mixing glass, bar spoon and strainer, stir liquors briefly over ice, strain into a chilled flute, top with Champagne and garnish.  
New Year's Brought to You By…
Event designer and stylist:  Andrea Gray Harper, Gray Harper Event Maker Location:  Brockington Hall Rentals:  Savannah Special Events and Gray Harper Event Maker Catering:  Thrive Café and Catering Stoneground grits:  Freeman’s Mill in Statesboro Paté:  Ashley Farm Chicken in Murrayville Quail eggs:  Suzanne Bailey, Sandy Creek Farm in Brooklet Local shellfish:  Russo’s Seafood Asiago popcorn topping: Flatcreek Lodge in Swainsboro Macarons:  Maison de Macarons Paper goods and graphic design: Samantha Sanford, Lavender & Honey Designs Hair and make-up:  Emily Warren and Jules De Jesus Fritz, Dollface by Jules Bowtie:  French Knot Studios Bartender:  Jacob Sanford Guests:  Michael Campanaro, Melody and Christopher Munn, Samantha and Jacob Sanford, Victoria Williams      

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Inspired by the first story she heard of the original Thanksgiving, a crafty local event designer stages a colorful feast with the help of some very talented natives and pilgrims. » Photography by Izzy Hudgins

“I  challenged myself to do a glitter-free party this time,” Audrey Wagner King laughs, causing a few gold glints to sparkle mysteriously on her face.  “I’ve been using glitter so much it never really comes off.” In lieu of the glitzier festivities, Audrey chose to host our Thanksgiving oyster roast, combining a celebrated coastal tradition with the “grade-school version” of America’s “pilgrims and natives” tale.  She gathered her creative co-conspirators around a rustic farm table at the Georgia State Railroad Museum, and brought in feathers, leather, earthenware and tribal patterns, along with pumpkin-shaped persimmon branches and harvest-hued flowers.  Her friends at FORM brought a seafood bounty complete with bacon-truffle oysters Rockefeller and Thai style shrimp salad on cucumber rounds.   “I thought Thanksgiving offered more of a blank slate than the other holidays,” observes the designer and founder of French Knot Studios.  “It’s usually more about food and people than about the décor.  I was excited to try things for the magazine that I might not get to do for a wedding client.” With her background in theater and costume design, Audrey opened French Knot Studios to teach fellow “makers” advanced crafting techniques, but she soon found herself creating custom décor for events. “Life is a performance,” she explains, “and every wedding or gathering has a story to tell.  Both theater and event design require calm energy and a resourceful mind.” Upcycled fun:  Audrey painted empty wine and beer bottles with metallic paint and added leather bands and feathers to make a ragtag row of vases as varied as her guests. What a card:  To make her feather-shaped place cards, Audrey Googled “clip art,” printed her chosen silhouette on heavy stock, cut out each shape and wrote names in white gel pen. Food for thought:  Saffron-laced prawns, scored flounder, pecan encrusted pork stuffed with pears, vanilla carrots and orange halves stuffed with sweet potato soufflé are just a few of the innovations Brian Torres and the FORM team brought to the table. Spice the space:  “Nicole (Schwalge of Simply Savannah Events) loves creating backdrops to enhance event venues and create a unique atmosphere,” Audrey says.   “I asked her to use her love of tribal designs and Southwestern colors.” Beyond pumpkin pie:  Natasha Gaskill of Lulu’s Chocolate Bar made a “naked” cake with apple layers and caramel-drizzled goat cheese frosting, and Brian added one of FORM’s signature pumpkin cheesecakes.   As a conversation-starter and keepsake, Audrey coordinated pens and crafted paper for guests to list the things they’re thankful for.

Occasional Drink: To make the Whipped Cider Martini, combine 2 oz. apple cider, 2 oz. whipped cream vodka, 1 oz. brandy, 1 oz. butterscotch Liqueur, and a dash of cinnamon and/or nutmeg   Shake with ice, pour and garnish with a “teeny” pumpkin or apple slice.

Brought to You By…
Stylist:  Audrey Wagner King, French Knot Studios, with Izzy Hudgins Location/Venue: Georgia State Railroad Museum Catering: John Osborne, James Kleinschmidt, Brian Torres (with Brian’s daughter, Lucia), FORM Cake: Lulu’s Chocolate Bar Table accessories: World Market Flowers: Fiftyflowers.com Painted backdrop: Nicole Schwalge, Simply Savannah Events Hair and make-up: Emily Warren and Jessica Mock, Dollface by Jules Clothing: Custard Boutique Jewelry: ZIA Boutique Guests: Melody Munn and Sterling Horry Savannah Magazine Thanksgiving from Munn Brothers on Vimeo.

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